best golf club brands

Looking for a new set of golf clubs and not sure which brand is right for you?

We’ve got you covered.

In this guide we’re going to run through the top 10 golf club brands in 2020.

You’ll recognize most of the brands on this list, but some well known brands (such as Nike) didn’t make the cut. And there is one relatively new brand making waves that you might not have come across before.

We’ve also made sure there are options for all budgets.

Let’s get started.

This Year’s Best Golf Club Brands

Here are our picks for the best golf club brands in 2020.

1. TaylorMade

TaylorMadeNow owned by adidas, TaylorMade started out in 1979 with just one product: an innovative driver made from steel rather than persimmon. As they expanded their range through the 80s, the company quickly gained a reputation as one of the best golf club manufacturers on the planet.

And these days TaylorMade is arguably the most popular brand on the PGA tour, with an impressive roster of pros including Tiger Woods, Jon Rahm, Rory McIlroy, Dustin Johnson, and Rickie Fowler carrying TaylorMade clubs in their golf bags.

…you’ll struggle to find a set of irons that can match TaylorMade’s Sim Max irons when it comes to going easy on off-center hits.

The company continues to innovate, changing the shape of traditional driver faces with the launch of their “Twist face” technology in 2018’s M3/M4 drivers. And their latest range of Sim drivers improves on the already impressive forgiveness and distance of last year’s M6.

Staying on forgiveness, you’ll struggle to find a set of irons that can match TaylorMade’s Sim Max irons when it comes to going easy on off-center hits.

Whether you’re a beginner, intermediate, or advanced golfer, we’d recommend TaylorMade, and they’re our #1 pick for this year’s best golf club brands.

Check out the TaylorMade Sim range here .

2. Ping

PingI’ve been gaming Ping irons for the past 6 years, starting off with a second hand set of G20s and currently playing Ping G400.

And my current driver is a Ping G, which I actually ‘downgraded’ to from a G400. Reason for the downgrade? I had a straight flight technology (SFT) G400 head, and as my natural shot is a draw, the bias was starting to turn my draw into a hook. My current Ping G is an LS tech (low spin) head with a stiff shaft.

I’d recommend Ping clubs to any mid to high handicapper.

They just know their onions when it comes to the game improvement sector. And if you’re looking for a set of forgiving clubs that will get the ball launching easily, forgive off center hits, and minimize side spin, you really can’t go wrong with Ping.

Their current lineup of pros isn’t quite as impressive as TaylorMade’s. But Tony Finau and Bubba both have Pings in their bag, and Patrick Reid (marmite character I know) hit every drive with a G400 on his way to clinching The Masters in 2018.

…if you’re looking for a set of forgiving clubs that will get the ball launching easily, forgive off center hits, and minimize side spin, you really can’t go wrong with Ping.

Save $100 on Ping G410 irons here .

3. Callaway

CallawayCallaway have been around since the early 80s, and are another golf brand whose innovations have moved golf club design forward over the years.

In particular, the introduction of the Callaway “Big Bertha” driver in 1991 ushered in the era of the larger, more forgiving driver heads we see today.

They’re well represented on the PGA and European tours, with pros on their roster including Phil Mickelson, Xander Schauffele, Francesco Molinari, and Henrick Stenson.

And as well as their pro clubs, they serve the mid-high handicap sector well, with their most recent Callaway “Mavrik” range including a “Max”, game improvement option with large head and impressive forgiveness.

Personally, I have an old Callaway XR 7 iron, and big bertha hybrid, which sometimes make it into my bag.

They’re well represented on the PGA and European tours, with pros on their roster including Phil Mickelson, Xander Schauffele, Francesco Molinari, and Henrick Stenson.

Callaway also owns Odyssey, which makes some of the best putters available right now.

Check out the Callaway Mavrik range here .

4. Robin Golf

robin golfNot heard of Robin Golf? They’re a relatively new brand, but are already making waves and generating positive media attention.

Their aim is to “make buying premium clubs easier and more approachable”, and there are a few nice touches that make that possible.

Firstly, their clubs are manufactured in the same facilities, using the same materials as the premium golf brands. And while not cheap ($699 for a standard set), what you’re getting is a set of superior quality clubs which would be at least double that price point if it had a more recognizable brand logo on the clubhead.

Robin Golf clubs fit into the Super Game Improvement category, so they are easy to hit, forgiving, and will get the ball up into the air.

Secondly, Robin Golf clubs fit into the Super Game Improvement category, so they are easy to hit, forgiving, and will get the ball up into the air. If you’re below a 10 handicap, they’re probably not the right clubs for you.

And finally, they have attractive payment and return options. You can spread the cost of Robin Golf clubs over monthly payments, and they offer free, no quibble returns for 90 days. Basically they allow you to try out their clubs and if you don’t like them, you can send them back.

Check out Robin Golf here .

5. Cobra

cobra golfCobra Golf is based in California, but owned by German sports giants Puma.

They’ve been around since the 70s and were one of the first golf club brands to introduce utility (hybrid) clubs.

Their game improvement irons consistently top lists of the best irons in the category, and for part of the 90s their oversized irons were the best selling irons in golf.

Pros who’ve teed it up with Cobra on the PGA tour include Rickie Fowler, Jason Dufner, and Bryson De Chambeau. While Lexi Thompson has used a Cobra King Speedzone driver on the LPGA.

Their game improvement irons consistently top lists of the best irons in the category

While mostly associated with the game improvement sector, Cobra also manufacture a forged range for lower handicappers (or those who just prefer the look and feel of a forged iron).

Check out the latest Cobra King F9 range here .

6. Titleist

titleistTitleist are probably most famous for their omnipresent Pro V1 golf ball, which revolutionized golf when first introduced on the PGA tour in October 2000. The Pro V1 continues to be the most played ball on the tour.

But the company also make some of the best golf clubs on the market, with leading pros including Adam Scott, Webb Simpson, and Justin Thomas carrying Titleist clubs in their bag.

Generally Titleist clubs better serve the lower handicap golfer. They do have game improvement options, but all things considered, we just feel that TaylorMade, Ping, Callaway, and Cobra serve this sector better.

They do have game improvement options, but all things considered, we just feel that TaylorMade, Ping, Callaway, and Cobra serve this sector better.

Although with that being said, their U-510 utility iron is one of our picks for the most forgiving (and easy to hit) driving irons around right now. If you’re looking for a fairway finder, you won’t be disappointed.

Check out Titleist’s 2020 lineup here .

7. Adams

adamsAdams “Tight Lies” fairway woods are pretty much legendary in golf.

The company was acquired by TaylorMade in 2012, and from what we can see do not seem to have launched any new clubs since 2015.

However, if you’re looking for one of the most reliable, straightest, and easiest to hit fairway woods on the market, Adams “Tight Lies” should still be your go-to club. And since you’ll find a ton of (good quality) second hand ones on eBay and other sites, we decided to include Adams on our list.

…if you’re looking for one of the most reliable, straightest, and easiest to hit fairway woods on the market, Adams “Tight Lies” should still be your go-to club.

And yes, I have one in my bag.

8. Mizuno

mizunoLike Titleist, Mizuno would generally be considered to be serving the better player.

Their forged irons are quite simply a thing of beauty. And of course with that beauty comes a hefty price point.

But if you’re a low single digit, and budget isn’t a problem, then a set of Mizuno JPX 919 Tour clubs in your bag will make you the envy of everyone in the clubhouse. And their design means they’re probably the most workable irons around. Just don’t miss the sweetspot!

…if you’re a low single digit, and budget isn’t a problem, then a set of Mizuno JPX 919 Tour clubs in your bag will make you the envy of everyone in the clubhouse.

Check out Mizuno’s range of golf clubs here .

9. Wilson

WilsonOn the completely opposite end of the scale from Mizuno we have Wilson. Many beginner golfers will start out with a set of Wilson clubs, as they make affordable golf clubs that are easy to hit and relatively gimmick free.

I still have a set of Wilson Prostaff 431 clubs, which I loan out to visitors when we want to squeeze in a round, or use to beat practice balls around the house. They’re a bit rusty, but 13 years after purchase, still more than capable of holding their own on the course.

If you’re looking to get started in golf and don’t want to shell out a huge amount for your first set of clubs, Wilson is a good choice.

If you’re looking to get started in golf and don’t want to shell out a huge amount for your first set of clubs, Wilson is a good choice. But with that being said, if you’re not bothered with your golf clubs being brand new (you shouldn’t be at that stage) then it’s worth looking for a second hand set of Pings on eBay.

Check out Wilson’s golf range here .

10. Cleveland

clevelandThe last golf club brand on our list is Cleveland.

And really, they made it onto our list for one reason: wedges.

While Cleveland make decent drivers (Cleveland Launcher is no slouch) and irons, it’s their wedges that are considered to be among the best on the market. I’ve got a Cleveland CBX2 in my bag.

And you’ll see Cleveland wedges in use any time you switch on the golf channel. J.B. Holmes, Graeme McDowell, and 2019 Open Champion Shane Lowry all use Cleveland wedges. And since Shane Lowry’s incredible short game was a big part of his win at Portrush, that’s a pretty glowing endorsement.

…you’ll see Cleveland wedges in use any time you switch on the golf channel.

Check out Cleveland’s 2020 range of wedges here .

Our Top Choices

Choose a set of clubs from any brand on this list and you won’t go wrong.

But if we had to pick a winner for each category, they would be:

  • Best overall: TaylorMade
  • Best for beginners: Wilson
  • Best for mid-high handicappers: Ping
  • Best for low handicappers: Mizuno

What’s Next?

That’s it for our rundown of the best golf club brands in 2020.

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